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Kate Tuttle

Writer & Critic

Kate Tuttle

Writing on books and authors, race and politics, family and childhood.

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A Sobering Meeting With ‘The Recovering’ Author Leslie Jamison

When Leslie Jamison’s book of essays, The Empathy Exams, came out in 2014, it established her as one of the stars of a new wave of women writing nonfiction that felt urgently relevant. The essays blended personal writing and journalism; Jamison’s point of view was powerful and flexible, encompassing both an expansive humanity and a jeweler’s eye for the strange and unsettling.
DAME Magazine Link to Story
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The women who wielded a pen like a weapon: Michelle Dean's 'Sharp'

In the 1987 movie "Broadcast News," a male colleague, angry at having to admit that Holly Hunter's character, a television producer, is right about something, shoots this line at her: "It must be nice to always believe you know better, to always think you're the smartest person in the room." Hunter responds, huskily and urgently, a tear forming in her eye, "No, it's awful."
Los Angeles Times Link to Story
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Is the Solidarity of Sisterhood a Myth?

Today’s cultural conversation around gender and power, turbocharged ever since allegations of sexual assault and harassment took down Harvey Weinstein, has been a long time coming. The #MeToo movement, pioneered by Tarana Burke, grew into a juggernaut on social media, a communal reckoning that both demanded men be held accountable for their actions, and invited women to share their stories of being sexually harassed and assaulted.
DAME Magazine Link to Story
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Tracing the roots of misogyny to ancient Greece and Rome with Mary Beard

The classicist Mary Beard opens her book “Women & Power” with a scene out of the Odyssey. Penelope leaves her room to approach the assorted suitors who more or less occupy her mansion, waiting for her to give up on long-lost Odysseus and marry one of them. When she requests they stop singing such songs, she is met with resistance from the youngest male there: Her adolescent son, Telemachus, chastises her. Return to your room, he tells her; public speaking is for men.
Los Angeles Times Link to Story
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Jaclyn Friedman Wants to 'Unscrew' Systemic Sexism

She’s spoken on college campuses, television and radio shows, and her own podcast, Unscrewed, about issues of sexual liberation. In her new book Unscrewed: Women, Sex, Power, and How to Stop Letting the System Screw Us All, Friedman tackles all of it—the whole tangled web of entrenched, systemic sexism and all its modern iterations.
DAME Magazine Link to Story
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Girls, Don’t Become Boy Scouts

The news arrived on Oct. 11, a day — as Facebook reminded us — designated as the International Day of the Girl. On the surface, it even seemed like it might be a progressive change: The Boy Scouts of America announced that it would allow girls to participate in Cub Scouts and to eventually earn Eagle Scout rank.
The New York Times Link to Story
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Tom Perrotta on Sex, the Suburbs, and his new MILF

When Tom Perrotta and his wife, Mary Granfield, sent their second child off to college two years ago, they found themselves navigating a brand new life stage. “Parenting becomes this career,” he says. “You’re in the thick of it, and then suddenly it’s – not quite over, but it doesn’t take up a huge amount of space anymore, and there’s a sense of reassessment of one’s adult life.”.
Los Angeles Times Link to Story
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Svetlana Alexievich’s ‘The Unwomanly Face of War’

They answered the call of patriotism. Some still in high school and some even younger, they begged at recruitment offices for a chance to join the fight.
Newsday Link to Story
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VP Pence's No-Lady-Company Policy Is Not About Respecting His Wife

I lost my good friend, Denis, two weeks ago. He and I are both straight, and never became romantically involved. I am married, and during our friendship, he got divorced and began dating another woman (whose grief right now I can’t even imagine). The world has lost a brilliant man, his children have lost a loving father, and so many of us have lost a great friend.
DAME Magazine Link to Story
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On Helen Gurley Brown's bio, "Not Pretty Enough"

If there’s nothing more American than a rags-to-riches story, then Helen Gurley Brown was truly an All-American Girl. Born in Arkansas in 1922, Helen Gurley’s world was rocked at age 10 by her father’s death in a freak elevator accident. Helen and her older sister were left to endure their mother’s unpredictable moods, strange ideas and disastrous plans.
Newsday Link to Story
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In Brief: Reviewing Mitford bio, two other new titles

Once they were as famous, or notorious, as any of today’s reality television stars. Born from 1904 to 1920 into England’s landed gentry, blessed with health, wealth, beauty, and a ravishingly eccentric childhood, the six girls grew to up blaze wildly divergent paths. “One can chant the careers of the Mitford sisters in the manner of Henry VIII’s wives,” notes author Laura Thompson: “Writer; Countrywoman; Fascist; Nazi; Community; Duchess.”.
The Boston Globe Link to Story
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Emma Cline's 'The Girls' is a gorgeous, disquieting spin on Manson family dynamics

Los Angeles Times Link to Story

About

Kate Tuttle

I'm currently serving as President of the National Book Critics Circle. My reviews and articles about books have appeared in the Boston Globe, Washington Post, Salon, Atlantic.com, and elsewhere. Native Kansan, longtime Cantabrigian, falling in love with Decatur, Georgia.

Feel free to email me at kate.tuttle@gmail.com.